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(2017) Downregulation of miR-192 causes hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation by inducing SREBF1: Novel mechanism for bisphenol A-triggered non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Biochimica et biophysica acta. Molecular and cell biology of lipids;Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Cell Biol Lipids;2017 Sep;1862(9):869-882

Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) has been associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Given that microRNA (miRNA) is recognized as a key regulator of lipid metabolism and a potential mediator of environmental cues, this study was designed to explore whether exposure to BPA-triggered abnormal steatosis and lipid accumulation in the liver could be modulated by miR-192. We showed that male post-weaning C57BL/6 mice exposed to 50I1/4g/kg/day of BPA by oral gavage for 90days displayed a NAFLD-like phenotype. In addition, we found in mouse liver and human HepG2 cells that BPA-induced hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation were associated with decreased expression of miR-192, upregulation of SREBF1 and a series of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis. Downregulation of miR-192 in BPA-exposed hepatocytes could be due to defective pre-miR-192 processing by DROSHA. Using HepG2 cells, we further confirmed that miR-192 directly acted on the 3'UTR of SREBF1, contributing to dysregulation of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. MiR-192 mimic and lentivirus-mediated overexpression of miR-192 improved BPA-induced hepatic steatosis by suppressing SREBF1. Lastly, we noted that lipid accumulation was not a strict requirement for developing insulin resistance in mice after BPA treatment. In conclusion, this study demonstrated a novel mechanism in which NAFLD associated with BPA exposure arose from alterations in the miR-192-SREBF1 axis.

MEDLINE 28483554 : Downregulation of miR-192 causes hepatic steatosis and lipid accumulation by inducing SREBF1: Novel mechanism for bisphenol A-triggered non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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This project is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (award #111062), Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions, and by The Metabolomics Innovation Centre (TMIC), a nationally-funded research and core facility that supports a wide range of cutting-edge metabolomic studies. TMIC is funded by Genome Alberta, Genome British Columbia, and Genome Canada, a not-for-profit organization that is leading Canada's national genomics strategy with $900 million in funding from the federal government.